A-Z of British Trolleybuses
In the last century, the trolleybus developed into a successful provider of public transport in many towns around Britain. Part streetcar, part bus, the trolleybus is unique in its speed and acceleration dwarf regular buses. Plus, it's quiet and fume-free, and consumed home-produced electricity generated using coal. There have been books about trolleybuses in the last several years, but few of them have tackled the subject from the vehicle manufacturers' angle. A-Z of British Trolleybuses describes each manufacturer and their products, and shows what happened to these vehicles throughout their lives.
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Calgary’s Electric Transit: An Illustrated History of Electrified Public Transportation in Canada’s Oil Capital
Calgary’s Electric Transit is the story of electric street railway, trolleybus and light rail vehicle transit in Canada’s western city of Calgary, Alberta. Calgary was founded in 1875, when the North West Mounted Police established a new fort – Fort Calgary. A big boost for Calgary came eight years later, when the Canadian Pacific Railway – building westward to the Pacific – reached the Bow River in 1883. Calgary became an important centre for Canadian Pacific operations and has since become the railway’s headquarters location. By 1909, Calgary boasted a population of 30, 000 people. In July of that year the Calgary Electric Railway began operations with two cars, sixteen employees and three miles of track. The system quickly grew and the following year became known as the Calgary Municipal Railway. Through its forty years of street railway service, Calgary acquired passenger cars from such well-known Canadian builders as Ottawa Car Manufacturing Company, Preston Car & Coach Company and the Canadian Car & Foundry. In addition, the system’s roster included used cars from several sources in the United States. Totalling 113 cars in all – plus a scenic car – it has been a daunting task to secure photos for this book. Many superb images have been discovered, illustrating the operation of streetcars in different sections of the city. There are over 150 streetcar photos. Finding trolleybus photographs has been a challenge as well, but the authors have succeeded in gathering a fine selection representing all classes of 'trackless trolley' coaches purchased new and acquired used from other US systems. You’ll see streetcars and trolleybuses operating in the city centre, in the rural suburbs, and in residential neighbourhoods. Coverage of today’s modern rail transit cars is outstanding. Now called 'light rail vehicles', all classes of these LRVs are represented, operating in all seasons, and over most portions of the system, illustrating the many varied and unique Calgary urban environments. Rich, carefully composed black and white photos are rounded out with a fine showing of subjects in colour. There’s a variety of photos to interest everyone with an interest in the development of Calgary as a city: the construction of 'The Bay', early scenes in Bowness Park, and some views of the streetcars serving seemingly unpopulated fields that today are thriving subdivisions. Whether you’re a railway enthusiast or simply interested in Calgary’s history, you’ll find Colin Hatcher and Tom Schwarzkopf’s 200-page account of Calgary’s Electric Transit a fascinating, informative and enjoyable reading experience.
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Christmas Stories from the Streetcar Barn
Five charming Christmas stories written to entertain children (and adults) and all involving the adventures of the streetcars of Fort Edmonton Park in Edmonton, Canada, Santa and the elves. Illustrated with pen and ink sketches.
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Cornwall Street Railway: The Insurance Company’s Streetcars
Cornwall Street Railway – the Insurance Company’s Streetcars tells the fascinating story of the electric transit services provided in the eastern Ontario city by the Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada, which owned the system from its inception in 1886 until the passenger transit facilities were taken over by the municipality in 1970 and the freight switching services were absorbed into the Canadian National Railways system in 1971. The book, originally prepared by Omer Lavallée and Anthony Clegg to honour the memory of Charles P. DeRochie, was essentially completed in the early 1990s, but publication was delayed due to Mr. Lavallée’s untimely death in 1992. It has now been brought to fruition by Railfare*DC Books and has been augmented by a selection of illustrations that were previously unavailable. Those who remember the Cornwall Street Railway will be glad to have this reminder of the trolleys, electric trolleycoaches, and electric switching locomotives that formerly served the city, while the serious students of municipal history and railway operations will be pleased to have a record of the well-known Canadian insurance company’s not so well-known operations in the transit field. The book consists of 102 pages with over 160 photographs. There are five maps which record the growth of the community and another which shows from whence came the Cornwall Street Railway equipment.
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Exact Fare Only: Good, Bad and Ugly Rides on Public Transit
We've all had good, bad, and sometimes ugly experiences on public transit. EXACT FARE ONLY is an anthology of real life stories about heading out, heading back, and everything that happened in between, whether the trip was across the country or just across town.
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Montreal Streetcars: Volume 2: People & Places
This award winning book is Tom Grumley's second on Montreal Streetcars in the Society's Traction Heritage Series. Thoroughly researched, it includes 54 photographs (23 in colour) plus a bonus - a large colour fold out map of the 1929 Montreal Tramway Company system. Montreal Streetcars Volume 2 includes comprehensive captions and additional information, this time about the people and places around the streetcar system.
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Montreal Streetcars: Volume 3 Scenic Routes

J. R. Thomas Grumley Softcover 43 pages

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Niagara St. Catharines and Toronto Railway: Electric Transit in Canada’s Niagara Peninsula
From its inception as a horsecar line in 1874, the Niagara, St. Catharines, & Toronto Railway is one of the foremost examples in Canada of an intensively developed and closely integrated transportation system. It operated local street railways, interurban lines, carload and less-than-carload freight, lake steamers, a large motor coach system, and even a circle trolley line around the Niagara Gorge. The NS&T and predecessors include the first electric railway in Canada to have operated without interruption, and the last interurban passenger service. Each aspect of the company’s operations was coordinated with others to form a transportation system which, while comparatively small in area, was very active in operation, and several distinct types of passenger service (local, commuter, inter-city and excursion) were developed. Author John Mills tells the story of all of them, with details on where the routes ran, maps of the line, stations, and connections with the many major railways that served the Niagara Peninsula. There are 256 pages of text, containing nine detailed system maps, a roster of the railway’s rolling stock, and over 300 fascinating photographs, fifty in full colour. Niagara, St. Catharines, & Toronto Railway tells the story of one of the area’s primary people mover operations in the days before automobile travel became dominant. With electric interurban railway cars and city streetcars serving key towns along the line, and ship connections to Toronto, the thriving and growing communities of Niagara Falls, St. Catharines, Welland, Port Dalhousie and others were well connected with other parts of Canada. They were also well connected with USA, thanks to frequent clean-running electric cars that travelled across the Canada-USA border on a regular through-fare basis. With hundreds of photos, many in full colour, the spectacular scenery of the area comes alive. Equipment is described, the system’s operations chronicled, and the excitement of expanding ship and electric transit is captured for the reader.
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Ontario’s Grand River Valley Electric Railways: The Story of the Area’s Streetcars, Trolley Coaches and Interurban Railways
This book concentrates on the electric lines of the part of Southern Ontario adjacent to the Grand River (plus a corporate outpost at Woodstock). Naturally fertile and prosperous, this area attracted early settlement which coalesced around two points: the head of river navigation at Brantford, and the waterpower sites at and north of Galt. The latter gave rise to a densely-settled triangle bounded by Galt (which later, with Preston and Hespeler, was incorporated into today's City of Cambridge), Waterloo, and Guelph, with outliers to the north at the Elmira and Fergus areas. Such conditions were ideal for the development of local railway transportation which appeared as expected: horsecar lines were built at an early date in Brantford and Berlin/Waterloo, and the Galt Preston & Hespeler was one of the first electric interurban lines in Canada. The vitality of the lines, particularly those in the northerly triangle, was thus established, and it continued for many years. The transformation of the GP&H into the Grand River Railway in the early 1920s was the most complete reconstruction in Canadian electric railway transit history. The book tells the story of the area's streetcars, trolley coaches, and interurban railways that provided both local and inter-city passenger, freight, and express delivery services to communities such as Guelph, Kitchener-Waterloo, Hespeler, Galt, Preston, Brantford, Woodstock, Ingersoll, Port Dover and many more. It explains how the individual railways began, the politics and economics that impacted their development, their rise and eventual decline. Profusely-illustrated with many rare photos, the book features over 200 images, about 50 of them in superb colour. About a dozen maps provide details on where the lines ran, and an equipment list delivers details on the various companies' rolling stock.
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Quebec Railway Light & Power Company – Volume 2: Citadel Division
QRL&P Volume 2 Citadel Division is a history of streetcar operation in Quebec City which ended in 1948. The book includes both colour and B&W glossy photos. Included is a series of maps, diagrams and equipment roster.
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Streetcars in the Kootenays: Nelson’s Electric Tramways: 1899 to 1992
Born at the turn of the century out of the promise of rich mineral discoveries, one of the smallest street railways in the British Empire once operated in Nelson, British Columbia. Its streetcars carried passengers up one of the steepest grades of any Canadian system, grades which led to some spectacular accidents. Streetcars in the Kootenays recounts the eventful history of the Nelson Electric Tramway Company. It is also the story of a few dedicated volunteers who began restoring the systems only surviving streetcar, which returned to operation along the Kootenay Lake in 1992.
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Subways of the World
Dig a token out of your pocket and head for the turnstiles of the worlds great subways in this fabulous and colorful journey! Learn about the design and construction history of each subway, the features that make each system unique, and the variety of rolling stock and motive power found on their tracks. Examines the premier subways of London, New York, Moscow, Paris, Toronto, Boston, Chicago, Washington D.C., San Francisco, and Tokyo. Climb aboard.
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The Sudbury Streetcars: The Sudbury-Copper Cliff Suburban Electric Railway Company
History of the Sudbury-Copper Cliff Suburban Electric Railway Co., a streetcar company that once served Sudbury, Ontario and the surrounding communities. Covers origins, construction, operation, expansion, financial difficulties and demise. Illustrated throughout with black and white photos. With roster, maps and timetable.
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Under Ground: Subways and Metros of the World
These days, a subway is an integral part of a city's heritage and a key feature of the urban landscape used by passengers, but subways are also full of history and art. They reflect a city's personality and its past and future, and are worthy of exploration, even for those not boarding a train. It's safe to say that a great many subways have overcome their past reputation for unpleasant shadiness. Subways revolutionized urban transport, moving people from crowded streets to efficient underground tunnels. This book has two parts: the first tells the stories of six major subways: London, Paris, Moscow, New York, Berlin, Tokyo. It describes their histories, the circumstances of their construction, and many anecdotes from what were invariably political, financial, engineering and architectural marathons. As well, deadly accidents, scarce funds and corruption set construction off the rails more often than not. The second half of the book is a stunning photo gallery of some of the most surprising subway stations around the world. They include examples from the six systems covered historically plus stations whose architecture reflects the cities and the people that they serve, including: Szent Gellért, Budapest; Puhung, Pyongyang, North Korea; Beitucheng, Beijing; Rådhuset, Stockholm; New York City; Toledo, Naples; and Concorde Station, Paris.
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