American Postwar Luxury Liners
After WWII, U.S. ports hosted the most luxurious and famous liners constructed by American master shipbuilders. These peacetime ambassadors carried refugees from war-torn lands to new lives in our shining cities and enabled leisurely travel in sparkling new American liners to tropical ports around the globe. The fascinating story of America's postwar luxury passenger liners like the famed United States, the fastest liner in the world, and her consort America, the American Export “sunliners” Constitution and Independence, Grace Lines fleet of luxury liners like the Santa Paula and Santa Rosa, the Moore-McCormack liners Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay, the “white ships” of the Matson Line, such as the Lurline and Monterey, and the American President liners President Polk and President Monroe along with period photographs, advertisements, menus, post cards and other memorabilia.
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By Steam Boat and Steam Train: The Story of the Huntsville and Lake of Bays Railway and Navigation Companies
A great little book about romantic holiday steamers and the small train that linked them.
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Fire Canoe: Prairie Steamboat Days Revisited (2nd Edition)
The story of steamboating in the Canadian West comes to life in the voices of those aboard the vessels of the waterways of the Prairies. Their captains were seafaring skippers who had migrated inland. Their pilots were indigenous people who could read the shoals, sandbars, and currents of Prairie waterways. Their operators were businessmen hoping to reap the benefits of commercial enterprise along the shores and banks of Canada’s inland lakes and rivers. Their passengers were fur traders, adventure-seekers, and immigrants opening up the West. All of them sought their futures and fortunes aboard Prairie steamboats, decades before the railways arrived and took credit for the breakthrough. Aboriginal people called them “fire canoes,” but in the latter half of the nineteenth century, their operators promoted them as Mississippi-type steamship queens delivering speedy transport, along with the latest in technology and comfort. Then, as the twentieth century dawned, steamboats and their operators adapted. They launched smaller, more tailored steamers and focused on a new economy of business and pleasure in the West. By day their steamboats chased freight, fish, lumber, iron ore, real estate, and gold-mining contracts. At night, they brought out the Edwardian finery, lights, and music to tap the pleasure-cruise market.
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Great White Fleet: Celebrating Canada Steamship Lines Passenger Ships
A richly illustrated story from the glory days of passenger travel on the Great Lakes. For decades Canada Steamship Lines proclaimed itself as the world’s largest transportation company operating on inland waters. Its passenger and freight vessels could be found on the Great Lakes as far west as Duluth, Minnesota, and as far east as the Lower St. Lawrence River. The passenger steamers were known collectively as the Great White Fleet. These ships – from day-excursion vessels to well-appointed cruise ships – had rich histories. The sheer scope of these passenger services were a wonder to behold. No fewer than 51 steamers comprised the passenger fleet at the company’s inception in 1913, and its network of routes was awesome. This is the story of the beloved steamers of the Great White Fleet from 1913–65, when the passenger vessels stopped running. Nearly half a century after the last passenger boats sailed, this book will provide a window into a wonderful lost way of life.
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Lusitania: Triumph, Tragedy, and the End of the Edwardian Age
On the 100th Anniversary of its sinking, King and Wilson tell the story of the Lusitania's glamorous passengers and the torpedo that ended an era and prompted the US entry into World War I. Lusitania: She was a ship of dreams, carrying millionaires and aristocrats, actresses and impresarios, writers and suffragettes, a microcosm of the last years of the waning Edwardian Era and the coming influences of the Twentieth Century. When she left New York on her final voyage, she sailed from the New World to the Old; yet an encounter with the machinery of the New World, in the form of a primitive German U-Boat, sent her and her gilded passengers, to their tragic deaths and opened up a new era of indiscriminate warfare. A hundred years after her sinking, Lusitania remains an evocative ship of mystery. Was she carrying munitions that exploded? Did Winston Churchill engineer a conspiracy that doomed the liner? Lost amid these tangled skeins is the romantic, vibrant, and finally heartrending tale of the passengers who sailed aboard her. Lives, relationships, and marriages ended in the icy waters off the Irish Sea; those who survived were left haunted and plagued with guilt. Now, authors Greg King and Penny Wilson resurrect this lost, glittering world to show the golden age of travel and illuminate the most prominent of Lusitania's passengers. Rarely was an era so glamorous; rarely was a ship so magnificent; and rarely was the human element of tragedy so quickly lost to diplomatic maneuvers and militaristic threats.
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Northern Steamboats: Timiskaming, Nipissing & Abitibi
Northern Steamboats: Timiskaming, Nipissing & Abitibi
Steamboats once traveled all of Ontario's navigable waterways -- the Great Lakes, the Ottawa River, the Rideau, the Kawarthas, the Muskoka Lakes -- but nowhere did they find a greater variety of employment than in the North. Here, steamboats served the lumber trade, brought settlers to their new lands, transported produce to markets, and helped to make possible the railways, the mining industry, paper mills, and tourism. They were lifelines to isolated communities and remote island villages. This fascinating account of the heyday of steam-boating in the North is a timely sequel to Richard Tatley's previous books, as divers probe the depths of northern waters for wrecks and our marine heritage is once again an important topic in the popular media and at museums across the country.
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Northern Steamboats: Timiskaming, Nipissing & Abitibi
Northern Steamboats: Timiskaming, Nipissing & Abitibi (Used)
Steamboats once traveled all of Ontario's navigable waterways -- the Great Lakes, the Ottawa River, the Rideau, the Kawarthas, the Muskoka Lakes -- but nowhere did they find a greater variety of employment than in the North. Here, steamboats served the lumber trade, brought settlers to their new lands, transported produce to markets, and helped to make possible the railways, the mining industry, paper mills, and tourism. They were lifelines to isolated communities and remote island villages. This fascinating account of the heyday of steamboating in the North is a timely sequel to Richard Tatley's previous books, as divers probe the depths of northern waters for wrecks and our marine heritage is once again an important topic in the popular media and at museums across the country.
not rated $25.00 Add to cart
Passenger and Merchant Ships of the Grand Trunk Pacific and Canadian Northern Railways
The untold history of the maritime branches of two giants of early-twentieth-century Canadian railroads. The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway and the Canadian Northern Railway, two giants of Canadian rail transportation, each operated maritime shipping ventures during the early twentieth century. Numerous vessels, including sidewheel, paddlewheel, and propeller steamers, tugboats, and barges, helped to build and serve these railways. Passenger and merchant ships sailed the West Coast, the Great Lakes, and St. Lawrence River, and served Canadian and European ports, in a time when groundings, shipwrecks, and sinkings often claimed lives. These same steamship lines played an important role in World War I, when Canadian vessels ferried men and war supplies. Many troopships and freighters were torpedoed, and Canadian Northern’s entire transatlantic fleet was virtually obliterated. Illustrated with contemporary photographs and drawings, this book pays tribute to the maritime enterprises of two trailblazing Canadian railway greats.
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RMS Queen Mary: 50 Years of Splendor
David Hutchings has provided a heavily illustrated history of this great Cunard Liner. RMS Queen Mary is a retired ocean liner that sailed primarily on the North Atlantic Ocean from 1936 to 1967 for the Cunard Line (known as Cunard-White Star Line when the vessel entered service). Built by John Brown & Company in Clydebank, Scotland, Queen Mary along with her sister ship, RMS Queen Elizabeth,[3] were built as part of Cunard's planned two-ship weekly express service between Southampton, Cherbourg, and New York City. The two ships were a British response to the superliners built by German and French companies in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Queen Mary was the flagship of the Cunard Line from May 1936 until October 1946 when she was replaced in that role by Queen Elizabeth. Queen Mary sailed on her maiden voyage on 27 May 1936 and captured the Blue Riband in August of that year; she lost the title to SS Normandie in 1937 and recaptured it in 1938, holding it until 1952 when she was beaten by the new SS United States. With the outbreak of World War II, she was converted into a troopship and ferried Allied soldiers for the duration of the war. Following the war Queen Mary was refitted for passenger service and along with Queen Elizabeth commenced the two-ship transatlantic passenger service for which the two ships were initially built. The two ships dominated the transatlantic passenger transportation market until the dawn of the jet age in the late 1950s. By the mid-1960s, Queen Mary was ageing and, though still among the most popular transatlantic liners, was operating at a loss. After several years of decreased profits for Cunard Line, Queen Mary was officially retired from service in 1967. She left Southampton for the last time on 31 October 1967 and sailed to the port of Long Beach, California, United States, where she remains permanently moored. Much of the machinery, including one of the two engine rooms, three of the four propellers, and all of the boilers, were removed. The ship serves as a tourist attraction featuring restaurants, a museum, and a hotel. The ship is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The National Trust for Historic Preservation has accepted the Queen Mary as part of the Historic Hotels of America.
not rated $95.00 Add to cart
RMS Titanic Manual: 1909-1912 Olympic Class
The world famous ocean liner Titanic, which sank on her maiden voyage in 1912, is the latest subject to receive the Haynes Manual treatment. With an authoritative text and hundreds of illustrations, see how this leviathan was built, launched and fitted out. Read about her lavish passenger accommodation. Learn about the captain's responsibilities, including the operation of a transatlantic liner. Consider the chief engineer's view -- how did he manage the huge engines and other onboard systems? What was it like to operate luxury ocean liner from the perspective of Titantic's owner, the White Star line?
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Samuel Cunard: Nova Scotia’s Master of the North Atlantic
An illustrated biography of a Canadian who sparked a world transportation revolution. In North America, the name Cunard is synonymous with shipping. This book traces the entrepreneurial rise of Samuel Cunard who, for decades, ruled a shipping empire on the North Atlantic. By the time Cunard died in 1865, he had witnessed the emergence of steamships, developed trade links with China and helped establish the Quebec and Halifax Steam Navigation Company. He was a director of the Bank of British North America and bought huge tracts of land in PEI. He won the transatlantic mail service contract between Britain and North America, and built several of the most luxurious steamships of the day. His ships helped Britain in the Crimean War and he became Sir Samuel Cunard for his support of the war effort. The Cunard line which he founded was long a major force in the development of international travel. This book combines the Cunard story with 150+ colour and black and white visuals covering Cunard's life and the subsequent history of his company. A fascinating and readable account of the brilliance and determination of one man who played an innovative role in world transportation history.
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Segwun: A Muskoka Tour
Have yet to have the pleasure? Don't worry, this lovely book provides a wonderful glimpse of a ride aboard the Royal Mail Ship Segwun, the last authentic operating steamboat in North America. Full of wonderful historical photographs.
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Sinking of the Titanic: Eyewitness Accounts
Published in 1912 within months of the sinking of the Titanic, this "memorial edition" of first-hand accounts by survivors, people in rescue boats, and other on-the-scene witnesses, offers heart-wrenching testimony about the great disaster, steeped in the sentiments of the day. Surviving passengers recount heart-breaking tales of parting with loved ones, watching the great ship sink while the steadfast band played "Nearer, My God, to Thee," and floating helplessly for long hours on icy seas. The search for responsibility began amid the grief of widows and orphans aboard the rescue vessel Carpathia, with accusations of ignored warnings, reckless attempts at record-setting, and the woefully inadequate supply of lifeboats. Enhancing the text are drawings of the ship's decks and luxurious interiors, along with numerous rare photographs of celebrity passengers, captain and crew, poignant images of survivors huddled in lifeboats, and many more striking scenes. Readers will be spellbound by the gripping, you-are-there quality of this unique volume and its remarkable vision of one of the great maritime disasters of history.
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Streamboat in a Cornfield
A rhyming text describes an incident on the Ohio River in 1910 in which the steamboat Virginia went aground in a cornfield.
not rated $98.00 Add to cart
Tales from the Great Lakes: Based on C.H.J. Snider’s “Schooner days”
For more than two hundred years, thousands of giant sailing ships traversed the Great Lakes carrying cargo and passengers. The memory of the romance and elegance of these beautiful ships has almost been forgotten in the search for greater efficiency and speed in our modern world. C.H.J. Snider (1879-1971) chronicled this era in his 1,303 "Schooner Days" columns for Toronto's The Evening Telegram between 1931 and 1954. A great marine researcher and artist, Snider himself worked aboard schooners in his youth and studied first-hand the development of the Great Lakes region. Coupled with Snider’s writings are those of Robert B. Townsend, who, besides introducing Snider’'s stories, adds some of his own.
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Tall Ships and Tankers: The History of the Davie Shipbuilders
Davie has been a synonym for shipbuilding on Quebec’s South Shore for more than one hundred and seventy years. Indeed, the families associated with the company can trace a shipbuilding lineage that reaches back to Canada’s colonial past. George Taylor, shipwright, arrived in Quebec in 1811, and after participating in the race against the Americans to secure naval control of Lake Ontario in what became known as the Shipbuilders’ War, he settled in Quebec and established himself as an independent shipwright of skill and integrity. In 1820, Allison Davie, a ship master newly arrived in Lower Canada, married Taylor’s daughter. The Taylor-Davie partnership flourished, building fully rigged ships for the British navy and steam-powered vessels to serve the towns of the St. Lawrence. As generation followed generation, workers at the venerable yard at Lévis successfully made the transition from sail to steam and from wooden-hulled vessels to steel, adopting new technology to suit new requirements. Davie shipyards have built and repaired tankers and freighters, fishing boats and ferries, offshore oil platforms, and warships ranging from coastal patrol vessels and minesweepers to destroyers, and frigates. Through the firm’s enterprising General Engineering Division, it has also ventured into industrial fabrication including railway cars and even sonar domes for U.S. warships. The company name has changed over the years, but the firm (now called Davie Industries) has always symbolized fine workmanship and been an integral part of Canada’s commercial and military history, contributing mightily to the growth and independence of this maritime nation.
not rated $150.00 Add to cart
The Challenge of the Atlantic: Man’s Battle With the World’s Toughest Ocean
This is a fine overview of the perils of the Atlantic from perspective of early sailing vessels, ocean liners, modern sailing, power boats, etc.
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The Discovery of the Titanic
An account of the author's discovery of the wreck of the 'Titanic' after years of planning and research.
not rated $47.00 Add to cart
The Golden Age of Ocean Liners
The remarkable story of the international competition to build the world’s fastest, largest, and most luxurious ships. Full color and archival photographs capture the glamour of this extraordinary era.
not rated $10.00 Add to cart