Alligators of the North: The Story of the West & Peachey Steam Warping Tugs
The Alligator was an amphibious machine designed and patented in Canada in the late 1880s. This warping tug was capable of towing a log boom across a lake and then portaging itself to the next body of water. Steam-powered and rugged, it was one of the pioneers in the mechanization of the forest industry and for more than thirty years was ubiquitous in northern Ontario until eclipsed by its worthy successor the Russel tug.
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Bowen Island Passenger Ferries
This book features numerous photos of early Canadian ferries, including classic wooden boats such as launches and speed boats. Photos are reproduced on high quality paper. The book tells the story of early travel to the Bowen Island holiday resort during the period 1921 - 1956. The central character in this enterprise was Tommy White, who became known to thousands of vacationers. White coped with competitors, politicians, and the Great Depression. This is a true story of boats, people, politics, and romance.
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Fire Canoe: Prairie Steamboat Days Revisited (2nd Edition)
The story of steamboating in the Canadian West comes to life in the voices of those aboard the vessels of the waterways of the Prairies. Their captains were seafaring skippers who had migrated inland. Their pilots were indigenous people who could read the shoals, sandbars, and currents of Prairie waterways. Their operators were businessmen hoping to reap the benefits of commercial enterprise along the shores and banks of Canada’s inland lakes and rivers. Their passengers were fur traders, adventure-seekers, and immigrants opening up the West. All of them sought their futures and fortunes aboard Prairie steamboats, decades before the railways arrived and took credit for the breakthrough. Aboriginal people called them “fire canoes,” but in the latter half of the nineteenth century, their operators promoted them as Mississippi-type steamship queens delivering speedy transport, along with the latest in technology and comfort. Then, as the twentieth century dawned, steamboats and their operators adapted. They launched smaller, more tailored steamers and focused on a new economy of business and pleasure in the West. By day their steamboats chased freight, fish, lumber, iron ore, real estate, and gold-mining contracts. At night, they brought out the Edwardian finery, lights, and music to tap the pleasure-cruise market.
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Little Book of Canal Boats
Britain's waterways have been used as a source of transport ever since man needed to convey large quantities of minerals, raw material and mass produced commodities. The Romans introduced canals to these islands as early as 120AD and by the late 1700s, a network of man-made arteries linked major rivers and sea ports to land-locked industrialised cities and towns across the country. Initially barges were pulled by horse but as steam and then internal combustion engines were developed during the 19th Century, they were introduced into the narrow boat. The advent of rail travel and improvements to roads, however, saw the decline of this slow and leisurely form of transport and canals gradually fell into disrepair. After World War II, it was realised that much of Britain's social and industrial heritage was disappearing and there emerged an enthusiasm to preserve our past as much as possible. 1946 saw the founding of the Inland Waterways Association who initially set about reopening parts of the system. Now there are more than 4,000 miles of navigable waterways with many more earmarked for restoration. They include some of Britain's greatest engineering feats such as tunnels, aqueducts and flights of locks, today numbering amongst our most popular tourist attractions.
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The River Palace
Steamboats carrying passengers from Hamilton to Montreal via the rapids of the St. Lawrence were a popular sight in the latter half of the nineteenth century. In 1855, the Kingston, an iron steamboat built for John Hamilton, appeared in the Great Lakes. When the Prince of Wales (later Edward VII) toured British North America in 1860, the Kingston became his floating palace for much of his time between Quebec and Toronto. While many steamboats claimed to be floating palaces, the Kingston truly was one. In 1855, the Kingston, an iron steamboat built for John Hamilton (1802-82), appeared in the Great Lakes. When the Prince of Wales (later Edward VII) came to British North America for the first royal tour in 1860, the Kingston became his floating palace for much of his time between Quebec and Toronto. Many steamboats claimed to be floating palaces. The Kingston was. The Kingston was wrecked many times and survived spectacular fires in 1872 and 1873. Late in her career, she was converted into a salvage vessel and renamed the Cornwall. In 1930 she was finally taken out and sunk near one of Kingstons ship graveyards. There she remained until diver Rick Neilson discovered her in 1989. Today, the once palatial Kingston is a popular dive site and tourist attraction.
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The Tug Book (2nd Edition)
This fully revised and updated second edition provides worldwide coverage of an increasing variety of towing vessels, the development of ever more complex propulsion systems and how tugs are operated in their various roles. Engineer and journalist Jack Gaston reviews the fierce competition among tug operators, particularly in the ship-handling business, which has resulted in manpower cuts and the emergence of very small tugs with unprecedented power, capable of carrying out the work of vessels twice the size. This unique book will be of interest not only to marine enthusiasts but also to the towage industry and its employees.
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Tugboats
Tugboats are the hardest working vessels in the shipping business, safely guiding freighters several times their weight and size to dock and back out to sea. This all-color salute to everyone's favorite little ship examines "tugs" today at ports around the world. In addition to depicting tugboats at work, the book explains the various tasks with which the boats are charged, the work of their crews, and the engines and designs that allow these relatively small vessels to tow incredible tonnage. The author also explains how older tugboats are overhauled for continued service and how manufacturers are finding new markets by revamping decommissioned tugboats-and even building brand new ones-for use as private cruisers. In addition to being a NASCAR journalist and the author of three previous MBI books on the subject-Behind the Scenes of NASCAR Racing, Stock Car Race Fan's Reference Guide and NASCAR Transporters-Bill Burt is a long-time tugboat fan just now getting the opportunity to indulge his passion in book form.
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Tugboats of the Great Lakes: A Photo Gallery
From the early days of commercial navigation on the waterways of the Great Lakes, tugboats have been needed to guide the ships in and out of the newly constructed ports. As the means of transportation progressed from wooden schooners to large steel steamships, the tugboat also grew in size. This book takes an in-depth look into the ancient practices of Great Lakes ice-breaking, ship-assistance and towing. At the turn of the century, the towing industry changed forever with the consolidation of fleets and the design of the low-profile powerful steam ship-docking tug. This "G-Tug" design has become known all around the world and these same 80-year old tugs are still the primary workhorse in most harbors on the Lakes today. Many other designs, unique to the fresh waters of the Great Lakes are profiled in this book. The severe climate of the Great Lakes region is brutal on the equipment and the tugs are built tough, for heavy ice breaking. A new class of powerful Coast Guard ice-breaking tugs came out in the 1940s. Today, many of these "WYTM" class tugs survive in commercial service on the Lakes. The Lakes have always been home to a large fleet of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers tugs. Additionally, U.S. Army auctions have brought many government-class tugs such as LTs, STs, and DPCs to the Lakes in the hands of private and commercial operators. In the rivers that feed the busy port of Chicago and all throughout New York State on the Erie Canal, a rare species of tug can be found-the famous "canallers" which are also featured in this volume.
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