Commercial Ships on the Great Lakes
For centuries, millions of tons of cargo have moved across the five Great Lakes. The lakes have always held on to the old-school ways of using single screw tugboats, steam propulsion, and incredibly talented engineers and captains who can maneuver their vessels in and out of tight quarters and winding tributaries. Although the Great Lakes are holding on to their old ways, big changes are occurring and we are at the end of an era. Original and historic images show ore boats, tugboats, barges, passenger vessels, and workboats at work on the lakes. Final chapters in the boneyard show the near and ultimate demise of these great ships at the end of an era, with newer construction techniques and technically advanced ships replacing the old-timers.
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Great Lakes Ore Docks and Ore Cars
The iron mining industry was quite extensive throughout the area known as the Lake Superior Iron Ore District, which included Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Ontario and other prominent iron mining regions to the north-east and east of Lake Superior in Ontario as well Quebec and Labrador. All of the iron ore was transported by rail to a wide number of lake ports on Lake Superior, Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. This book lists all of the ore docks constructed on the Great Lakes, as well as their operational life span right up to the present time. Each chapter for each railroad includes the types of ore docks once or currently operated as well as a roster of ore cars from the 1940s to the present time, and includes photos of the ore docks and ore cars, ore car schematics and pertinent data. It also provides some new perspectives for historical and future research, and can be used for the art work of model railroading.
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Great Lakes Shipping Ports & Cargoes (Photo Gallery)
On average, over 163 million net tons of cargo are moved each year on the Great Lakes in the holds of a vast fleet of steel ships. From the western end of Lake Superior, to the shallow, emerald-coloured waters of Lake Erie, ships arrive and depart at all hours amid a landscape of dirt-laden mill buildings, smoke streaked skies, and vast fields of coal and iron ore pellets. The photographs in this book will show you a slice of industrial America rarely seen by the general public. These images, contemporary and historic, will take you to all of the primary loading and unloading ports from Lake Superior to Lake Erie. View first-hand how cargoes are loaded at the grain terminals of Thunder Bay, the ore docks of Minnesota’s north shore, or the sprawling Midwest Energy coal dock in Superior. See where these giant ships and cargoes go “down below” on the infamous Cuyahoga River, the Ford Plant on Detroit’s Rouge River, or inside the heart of the famous U.S. Steel Works in Gary, Indiana.
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Lake Boats: The Enduring Vessels of the Great Lakes
The romance of the great inland sea. This large-format, full-color pictorial pays tribute to the historic ships still at work on the Great Lakes, from ancient cement boats such as the 100-year-old St Marys Challenger to venerable "straight-deckers," self-unloaders and 1,000-footers sailing under the familiar flags of prominent Great Lakes fleets: Algoma Central, Upper Lakes, Lower Lakes, American Steamship, Canada Steamship Lines and others. With more than 170 photographs by the author and other fine transportation photographers, Lake Boats celebrates these mariners and working ships of the St. Lawrence Seaway and Great Lakes. A thorough appendix cites exact identification, specifications and the history of each vessel included in the book. An extraordinary range of images -- from close-up and interior views of engine rooms and pilothouses to panoramic scenes of these noble workhorse vessels sailing North America's inland seas -- makes Lake Boats a remarkable celebration.
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Little Book of Canal Boats
Britain's waterways have been used as a source of transport ever since man needed to convey large quantities of minerals, raw material and mass produced commodities. The Romans introduced canals to these islands as early as 120AD and by the late 1700s, a network of man-made arteries linked major rivers and sea ports to land-locked industrialised cities and towns across the country. Initially barges were pulled by horse but as steam and then internal combustion engines were developed during the 19th Century, they were introduced into the narrow boat. The advent of rail travel and improvements to roads, however, saw the decline of this slow and leisurely form of transport and canals gradually fell into disrepair. After World War II, it was realised that much of Britain's social and industrial heritage was disappearing and there emerged an enthusiasm to preserve our past as much as possible. 1946 saw the founding of the Inland Waterways Association who initially set about reopening parts of the system. Now there are more than 4,000 miles of navigable waterways with many more earmarked for restoration. They include some of Britain's greatest engineering feats such as tunnels, aqueducts and flights of locks, today numbering amongst our most popular tourist attractions.
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Passenger and Merchant Ships of the Grand Trunk Pacific and Canadian Northern Railways
The untold history of the maritime branches of two giants of early-twentieth-century Canadian railroads. The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway and the Canadian Northern Railway, two giants of Canadian rail transportation, each operated maritime shipping ventures during the early twentieth century. Numerous vessels, including sidewheel, paddlewheel, and propeller steamers, tugboats, and barges, helped to build and serve these railways. Passenger and merchant ships sailed the West Coast, the Great Lakes, and St. Lawrence River, and served Canadian and European ports, in a time when groundings, shipwrecks, and sinkings often claimed lives. These same steamship lines played an important role in World War I, when Canadian vessels ferried men and war supplies. Many troopships and freighters were torpedoed, and Canadian Northern’s entire transatlantic fleet was virtually obliterated. Illustrated with contemporary photographs and drawings, this book pays tribute to the maritime enterprises of two trailblazing Canadian railway greats.
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Schooners: Great Lakes Album Series
The "Great Lakes Album Series" is a tribute to the vessels that helped develop the Great Lakes basin into one of the world's major industrial heartlands. The illuminating text and fascinating historical photographs bring to life the memorable story of these hard-working lake vessels and their crews.
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Tall Ships and Tankers: The History of the Davie Shipbuilders
Davie has been a synonym for shipbuilding on Quebec’s South Shore for more than one hundred and seventy years. Indeed, the families associated with the company can trace a shipbuilding lineage that reaches back to Canada’s colonial past. George Taylor, shipwright, arrived in Quebec in 1811, and after participating in the race against the Americans to secure naval control of Lake Ontario in what became known as the Shipbuilders’ War, he settled in Quebec and established himself as an independent shipwright of skill and integrity. In 1820, Allison Davie, a ship master newly arrived in Lower Canada, married Taylor’s daughter. The Taylor-Davie partnership flourished, building fully rigged ships for the British navy and steam-powered vessels to serve the towns of the St. Lawrence. As generation followed generation, workers at the venerable yard at Lévis successfully made the transition from sail to steam and from wooden-hulled vessels to steel, adopting new technology to suit new requirements. Davie shipyards have built and repaired tankers and freighters, fishing boats and ferries, offshore oil platforms, and warships ranging from coastal patrol vessels and minesweepers to destroyers, and frigates. Through the firm’s enterprising General Engineering Division, it has also ventured into industrial fabrication including railway cars and even sonar domes for U.S. warships. The company name has changed over the years, but the firm (now called Davie Industries) has always symbolized fine workmanship and been an integral part of Canada’s commercial and military history, contributing mightily to the growth and independence of this maritime nation.
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The Age of Sail: Master Shipbuilders of the Maritimes
The 19th century was the age of shipbuilding in the Maritime Provinces: all along the coast men were turning trees into ships that would sail on the world's oceans. Farmers and fishermen became master craftsmen building huge, deep-water vessels. In this beautifully illustrated volume, marine historian Stanley Spicer recaptures the age of sail and its many colourful characters. From hundreds of shipbuilders, Spicer has selected the Troops of Saint John, the Killams of Yarmouth, Joseph Cunard in Bathurst, the Peake family of Prince Edward Island, John Young of Lunenburg and the Moshers in Avondale. Through these often larger-than-life figures we explore the triumphs and tragedies of the Maritimes' great age of shipbuilding and ship owning. The Age of Sail draws on a range of rich visual resources including ship portraits, archival photographs, engravings, and artifacts displayed in the collections of leading Maritime museums, adding depth to a gripping historical account.
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York Boats of the Hudson’s Bay Company: Canada’s Inland Armada
York Boats of the Hudson's Bay Company, Canada's Inland Armada tells the stories of men and boats that helped lay the foundations of Canada's western provinces and northern territories. Johnson's accomplishment serves to fill in a missing page in Canadian history - no other book tells in such detail and with such drama the history of this particularly Canadian mode of transportation and exploration. Hardly the lighthearted story of a band of merry canoeists hauling goods from port to settlement, York Boats of the Hudson's Bay Company is about the "hardest work ever seen by human beings". A triumph of human ingenuity and strength against the most severe elements. Johnson gives voice to the Metis, First Nations, French Canadians, and Orkneymen, who poled, sailed, rowed, and portaged the "newfangled boats with keels" up and down Canada's rivers. Through rapids, firestorms, freezing cold, and over impossible terrain, the York boatmen and guides worked themselves to the bone to deliver freight from York Factory on Hudson Bay to the scattered settlements within Rupert's Land. They also came to the aid of settlers, charted new territory, and found new resources throughout Canada's west and north. With 57 archival images, 11 maps, and two appendices, illustrating the York Boat story, York Boats of the Hudson's Bay Company is not just history - it's armchair adventure.
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