The Pictorial History of Air Warfare
This is a photographic history of combat aircraft. Content covers: Pioneer Days The Experimental Stage The Early Peak Air-to-Air Armament World War I Air-to-Surface Armament World War I Air-to-Air Armament Between the Wars and World War II Air Warfare Between the Wars Tactical Air Power in Europe and North Africa World War II Strategic and Tactical Air Power in Europe World War II Air Tactics Air-to-Surface Armament World War II The PAcific Teatre World War II Korea, Indo-China, Suez Modern Air Warfare Surface-to-Air Armament
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The Pictorial History of Fighter Aircraft
Fighter aircraft and their pilots are the knights on grand steeds of the aerial battlefield. This was just as true in skies over Europe in 1914 as it is in the skies of the Middle East or other such world trouble spots. In terms of speed and power, fighters have always been on the leading edge of aviation technology. These planes and their pilots also operate—as always—on the leading edge of danger, in that rarified environment where the heat of battle meets the cool nerves that are essential to survival. Fighters can be—and frequently have been—adapted to a variety of roles, but their raison d'etre is fighting other airplanes. Like the mounts ridden by the knights of the Middle Ages, and indeed like the knights themselves, fighters are bred to fight, bred to win. A fighter aircraft must serve its pilot almost as though it were an extension of his hand and mind. It must give the pilot the maximum in clean unobstructed vision. In World War 1, the pilot sat in an open cockpit with a very good view of the entire hemisphere above him. Over the years, the cockpit became more and more enclosed until, by the early 1940s, the pilot's field of view was compromised by a lattice-work grid. By the 1970s, however, advancements in Plexiglas technology caught up, and bubble canopies (including one-piece bubble canopies on American F-I6s) reappeared. To become an extension of the pilot himself, the fighter airplane not only must give him a clear field of view, it must give him a clear field of action. It must respond instantly to his every whim. To do this, it must be very maneuverable; and to be very maneuverable a fighter must be very unstable. Stability is the characteristic most sought for the airliners in which most people travel, but the chariot of the fighter pilot must be just the opposite—unstable to the point of being almost dangerous yet capable of spins, loops and power dives that no airliner would ever undertake. Like the medieval knight with whom we have compared him, the fighter pilot is a specialized breed. So is his airplane. They fly and fight in a world far removed from the rest of the battlefield. It is a distant yet deadly world where survival depends on a pilot's ability to apply his skills in one-on-one com-bat against someone who aspires to the very same skills. In this world, the pilot's only assets are his own ability to do his job with speed and precision, and the ability of his steed to respond to, and support, him. This is the story—in pictures and words of the successive generations of airplanes that have been the outposts on the leading edge of aviation technology, the silver birds that have carried successive generations of the twentieth century's most daring aerial warriors.
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The RAF: 1918-2018
For a hundred years the Royal Air Force has been at the forefront of the UK's defences. In the 1920s and 1930s, the RAF protected Britain's empire; during the Second World War it played a key role in defeating the Axis; and through the 1950s and 1960s it was a key part of Britain's nuclear deterrent. Julian Hale examines the history of the RAF through its organisation, personnel, aircraft and campaigns, from the biplanes of the First World War, through its 'Finest Hour' in 1940 and the dawn of the jet age to today's hi-tech aircraft and the emerging role of the unmanned aerial vehicle. Enriched with personal accounts and a wealth of photographs, this book provides a concise introduction to the world's first air force.
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The Red Baron’s Last Flight: A Mystery Investigated
Much has been written about Manfred von Richthofen's last flight and combat on the morning of April 21st 1918, and much controversy remains to this day. Both authors have travelled to the sight of Richthofen's final crash, studied the landscape and have discovered what many eye-witnesses of the time could see, and more importantly, what they could not have seen. During research for "Under the Guns of the Red Baron", a file of letters written by eye-witnesses to von Richthofen's crash, dated in the 1930s, was discovered. These letters were written many years before later reports became clouded in the mists of time. The final result is a detailed account of von Richthofen's last flight in which he persued a Sopwith Camel across the allied front line, and ended in a mortal wound from a single bullet.
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The Rise and Fall of the German Air Force 1933-1945
Written by the men and women who conducted the intelligence campaign against the Germans, it recounts in full the principal campaigns, and traces problems encountered in the field. It is based on reliable sources, including documents seized from the archives of Luftwaffe after the war, and aims to provide an unbiased account.
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The Saab-Scania Story
This is the illustrated history of the two companies, Saab and Scania, their aircraft and automobiles.
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The Short Sunderland in World War II
This is a pictoral and photographic history of the Short Sunderland aircraft and its participation in World War II. Appendices include a list of all RAF Sunderlands and their fates, squadron codes, etc.
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The Tiger Moth Story
The Tiger Moth is one of the major aviation success stories. Developed by Geoffrey de Havilland during the early 1930s and flown for the first time on October 26th, 1931, the biplane became the most important elementary trainer used by Commonwealth forces. More than 1,000 Tiger Moths were delivered before WWII, and subsequently around 4,000 were built in the UK with an extra 2,000 being manufactured in Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Following the end of WWII, pilots could buy and modify a Tiger Moth for recreational use or agricultural crop spraying and use it relatively cheaply. This, combined with its popularity within the aero club movement, provided employment for the Tiger Moths until the late fifties when the more modern closed cockpit aircraft forced them into retirement. The Tiger Moth Story provides a comprehensive account of the aircraft origins and development as a trainer of Commonwealth pilots in times of peace and war, as a crop duster, glider tug, aerial advertiser, bomber, coastal patrol plane and aerial ambulance as well as in frontline service. Technical narrative and drawings, handling ability and performance as seen through the eyes of the pilots including a fully updated world survey of existing aircraft combine to make The Tiger Moth Story the most comprehensive book of the aircraft. A bestseller since 1964, this edition is fully revised, updated, indexed and includes many new black and white photographs, plus a new color section.
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The Vital Guide to Fighting Aircraft of World War II
This superbly produced pocket-sized reference is filled with 12 of the most important combat aircraft of WWII. Each page is devoted to a single type and displays a detailed color technical drawing, a 3-view drawing, an action photograph, and descriptive text. Every nation is represented.
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The Wild Blue: The Novel of the U.S. Air Force
Follows the lives of six very different airmen at work, at war, and at home, capturing all the joys and agonies from basic training, to Korea and Vietnam, and beyond.
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The Wing and the Arrow
It's the beginning of the Cold War - a new and threatening power is emerging in the Soviet Union which escalates the pace in the race for the skies. This contest will pit East against West, friend against friend, and the US Wing against the Canadian Arrow.
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The World’s First Jet Bombers: Arado AR 234, Junkers JU 287
This is a wonderful pictoral and photographic account of the Arado AR 234 and Junkers JU 287, the world's first jet bombers.
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The World’s Greatest Interceptor Aircraft
A superbly detailed examination of the 20 most important interceptor aircraft in the world today including the Sea Harrier, Mirage F1, MiG-29, JA 37 Viggen, and F-14 Tomcat. Each entry is accompanied by gatefold artwork, plus the operational history of the particular model showing how it was developed and how it has performed during service life.
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Through Footless Halls of Air: The Stories of a Few of the Many Who Failed to Return
Exciting stories of six Atlantic Canada airmen who failed to return from aerial operations during the Second World War, with a foreword by Air Vice-Marshall J.E. "Johnnie" Johnson.
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Tomcats Forever
The F-14, in production for two decades, was one of the best air-to-air combat machines. Other volumes may address the political, economic and corporate issues. We are here not to speak of politics but to show the Tomcat to our audience through the medium of photos. Photos aboard the carrier, photos returning from combat off the Libyan coast, and still more photos. None of the color plates has ever been published before. So enjoy the colour portraits that follow, a new way of looking at the Tomcat.
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Tornado (Warbirds Illustrated No. 42)
The Tornado is remarkable in many ways. It is a true multi-role combat aircraft, and was known as MRCA for several years before being christened Tornado in March 1976. It was born out of a vital need for rationalization of equipment within NATO and is, indeed, international. The manufacturers, Panavia GmbH, are a consortium of British Aerospace (BAe), Messerschmitt-Bölkow-Blohm (MBB) and Aeritalia (AIT), while the engines are built by Turbo-Union, formed by Rolls-Royce, Motoren and Turbinen Union (MTU) and Fiat. Apart from the final assembly lines for complete aircraft, there is no duplication of manufacture within the programme. Tornado has proved that collaboration can work to produce a combat aircraft to satisfy the needs of four air arms. To do this, two basic designs were evolved, the interdictor-strike (IDS) aircraft and the air defence variant (ADV). In addition to the nine prototypes and six pre-series aircraft, 805 production aircraft were initially required. Four of the pre-series aircraft are to be refurbished and bought up to full production standard, and the resulting 809 aircraft are being distributed as follows: 96 IDS for the German Marineflieger and 228 IDS for the Luftwaffe; 100 IDS for the Aeronautica Militare Italiana; and 220 IDS (GR.1) and 165 ADV (18 F.2/2A plus 147 F.3) for the RAF. Despite several attempts to sell Tornado to Canada, Australia, Spain and Greece, the first export order (for the RAF's ADV) came from Oman in August 1985, with a modest eight and an option on another eight. A month later in September, Saudi Arabia signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the UK to supply a 'package deal' of aircraft consisting of 48 Tornado IDS, 24 ADVs, 30 Hawk, trainers and 30 PC-9 trainers. As we close for press, it is quite probable that Jordan will sign for a mix of both types, having had a request for US equipment rejected. Panavia is also leading a bid for 40 aircraft for Turkey, while Japan is looking at Tornado as well. It has also been announced that Germany is beginning the development of a third major type, the Electronic Combat/Reconnaissance (ECR) variant, for which there is now an order for 35 aircraft. Air arms are at last becoming aware that Tornado is an aircraft worth having. Indeed, the most recent testimonials to the Tornado are the results achieved by the RAF in the 1984 and 1985 USAF Strategic Air Command annual bombing competitions. In the three events for which the aircraft was eligible, the RAF on both occasions came first in two and second in the other. As might be expected, many of Tornado's critics came from the United States, and this successful performance has proved that the Tornado cannot be dismissed out of hand. I have been fortunate to have followed the Tornado's progress since 1973, having witnessed certain 'milestones' in person and spoken with many people involved in the programme over that time. This book presents a photographic record of the aircraft's development and service record to date. I wish to acknowledge, with grateful thanks, the assistance of the following, either specifically for this book or generally since 1973: Folkhard Oelwein of Panavia; Wolfram Wolf of MBB; Alfredo Mingione of Aeritalia; Alex Johnston (now retired), Geoffrey Hill and David Kamiya of British Aerospace; Barry Ellson of RAF Germany; HQ, RAF Strike Command; Richard L Ward of Modeldecal; and Pete Cooper and David Mason of BARG. Once upon a time I heard MRCA being spelt out as 'Mother Riley's Cardboard Aeroplane'. No longer is the Tornado so scorned. It has proved itself in service, and long may it remain in service.
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Total Force: Flying with America’s Reserve and Guard
Total Force features fighter and attack planes, airlift and tankers, special task aircraft, and helicopters of the Air National Guard, Air Force Reserve, Army National Guard, Army Reserve, Naval Reserve, and Marine Corps Reserve. Also included is a reference section with with brief descriptions of each aircraft, flight specifications, and three-view drawings. Interviews reveal the pride pilots and crew take in their planes, their missions, and their fellow reservists.
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Tumult in the Clouds: British Experience of War in the Air, 1914-1918
A history describing the human endeavours of the pioneers of military aviation in the First World War. Using personal testaments incorporating fresh oral material, diaries and letters the authors show how life chagned from the early days of unarmed encounters to the deadly combat of the final years.
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Typhoon and Tempest at War
  Although they played a significant part in the Allied victory in the air in World War II, the Typhoon and Tempest series of fighters have passed largely unsung. This book sets out to rectify that omission, plotting the course, with all its many disappointments, of the inspired Sydney Camm design which started off just before the war as the Tornado and finished up after hostilities as the Fury, the fastest prop-powered fighter in the world. The early days of Typhoon development were trying ones for all concerned at Hawkers and the many other aircraft companies involved. There was severe mechanical trouble with the engine; there was a structural fault that caused tails to snap off, and then the Air Ministry wanted to cancel the project because it failed to meet its design specification as a high-altitude fighter. But championed by Roland Beamont, co-author of this book, and a few others who had faith in it, the Typhoon became one of the most potent weapons of air assault when Britain began to go on the offensive against Nazi Germany. And in the Tempest, which developed out of the Typhoon, Britain found a timely shield against the V1s when these pilotless flying bombs were raining on London.
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US Navy Air Wings: Flamboyant Markings 1965-1975
This is a photographic history of aircraft markings used American Navy between 1965 and 1975.
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US Sky Spies Since World War I
Captioned photographs plus text describe the history of specialized aircraft and the men and equipment associated with them.
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US Spyplanes (Warbirds Illustrated No. 24)
Ever since the first aerial photograph was taken, from a military observation balloon, commanders have been fascinated with this capability, and over the years systems have evolved into extremely sophisticated devices, capable of gathering all forms of data, from low-level tactical observation to Earth-orbit, high-resolution photography. Today's satellite systems afford facilities for very high quality elint (electronics intelligence) and photographic reconnaissance, but, complementing the data returned from space, that collected by the manned aircraft is still vital, and the need for immediate, accurate information has led to the development of stable and flexible reconnaissance platforms known as `spyplanes'. We will, in this volume, only glimpse the strategic reconnaissance story. Missions are usually carried out under a cloak of extreme secrecy by a single aircraft. No weapons are carried, nor payloads delivered, only the probing eyes of photo-optical systems or the invisible impulses of electronic sensors. Even when a particular mission is successful, there can be no disclosure or claim of recognition. The need for policy makers to have an immediate assessment of a global 'hot spot' or to accumulate the information necessary to determine long-term strategy depends on reconnaissance capabilities. Within this realm we will look at several of the truly amazing aircraft that have been produced to meet this need. Many aircraft specifically developed to carry out a strategic reconnaissance role have become 'classics' and have performed well beyond what could originally have been imagined. In this respect, special recognition must go to the creative design genius of Clarence `Kelly' Johnson of the Lockheed-California Company: his name and successful futuristic aircraft are synonymous. It is difficult to believe that the Lockheed U-2, first flown in 1955, is, in the form of the U-2R/TR-1, still contributing today. As far as we know, the U-2 has gone back into production at least three times since its inception. The F-12 series of high-performance Mach 3+ aircraft was originally developed as a programme of advanced interceptors. The design finally evolved into the SR-71, which is featured heavily in this volume. Strategic Air Command keeps 'an unspecified number' of Blackbirds on flight status and another 'unspecified number' in flyable storage. They are rotated in and out as demand arises and budgets allow. Although the airframe itself reportedly acquires strength through age, many subsystems have to be replaced on a continuing basis. Unlike that of the U-2, the SR-71's tooling was destroyed after the initial production run. Perhaps this tells us something; perhaps more efficient tooling methods for a follow-on aircraft were being considered many years ago. In some areas the cloak of mystery is being gently lifted, but we can only speculate about the future. For now, we must study what we have. For their assistance with photographs for this volume, special thanks go to Bob Ferguson, Lockheed-California Co.; Jim Goodall; John Andrews; Lt. Col. John Alexander USAF, Offutt AFB; and Nancy Lovato (NASA/Dryden FRF).
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