A Gentlemen’s Agreement: Newfoundland And The Struggle For Transatlantic Air Supremacy
The early 1930s were desperate years for Newfoundland, a decade of mass unemployment and looming economic collapse. But it was also a time of great hope for aviation, as aircraft companies raced to build planes that could fly great distances--including across the Atlantic Ocean. No country on either side of the Atlantic wanted to be left behind in the competition for prime landing sites, a situation that placed Newfoundland in the crosshairs for those seeking supremacy in transatlantic flight. Competition for the island's aviation rights was fierce; nations and companies engaged in deals, double-deals, and under-the-radar "Gentlemen's Agreements" in efforts to take control of aviation's greatest prize. Newfoundland's ruling politicians and merchant class, however, were poorly prepared and, in attempting to exercise the Dominion's role in the greater community of nations, unintentionally initiated Newfoundland's loss of independence. Author Robert C. Stone has meticulously researched and unraveled these muddled plots, demonstrating how Newfoundland was, for a time, the most important country in the world--and then gave it all away.
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A History of 413 Squadron
Since its birth during World War II, Tusker Squadron has served Canada with pride and distinction. From Ceylon to the Arctic, Europe to the Maritimes, it has watched over the waves for more than fifty years. The men and women of 413 Squadron have dedicated their lives to saving others, including F/L L.J. Birchall - the Saviour of Ceylon - who successfully warned the Allies of the Japanese invasion before being captured. They have patrolled the Indian Ocean, mapped Canada s North, fought in two wars and conducted all-weather interception. Today, they continue to serve faithfully by carrying out invaluable search and rescue duties along the Atlantic and eastern Arctic coasts. This is their story, brought to life through numerous archival photos and the words of those who served.
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AIRCOM: Canada’s Air Force
AIRCOM is a visual feast that shows all the aircraft operated by Air Command. It also focuses upon the people who make the air force work, and on their many bases. A special section deals with Canada's Hornets in the Persian Gulf War.
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Amazing Airmen: Canadian Flyers in the Second World War
Canadian and British airmen engaged in fierce and deadly battles in the skies over Europe during the Second World War. Those who survived often had to overcome incredible obstacles to do so - dodging bullets and German troops, escaping from burning planes and enduring forced marches if they became prisoners. In one story, a tail gunner from Montreal survived despite being unconscious when blown out of his bomber. Another story describes how the crew of a navigator from Ottawa used chewing gum to fill holes in their aircraft. And another tells how a pilot from northern Ontario parachuted out of his plane and became the target of a German machine-gunner, but within hours 120 Germans surrendered to him. These painstakingly researched stories will enable you to feel what now-aging veterans endured when they were young men in the air war against Nazi Germany.
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And I Shall Fly: The Flying Memoirs of Z. Lewis Leigh
Z. Lewis Leigh was the first pilot to work for Trans Canada Airlines in 1937. During World War II, Leigh joined the Royal Canadian Air Force. His first assignment was anti-submarine flying, but was transferred to Transport Command in 1942 where he would beremembered for his excellent administrative abilities, revolutionizing how Transport Command operated. Leigh continued in RCAF service until 1957. These memoirs chronicle the years he spent devoted to flying.
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Austin Airways: Canada’s Oldest Airline
Austin Airways was Canada's oldest airline and started service in 1934. The home base was Timmins and it operated many duties in addition to passenger and freight services. Over the years, scheduled services served over 40 cities in Ontario, Quebec, the Northwest Territories, and one destination in the United States. In 1973 it merged with White River Air Services but continued to operate as Austin Airways. Over its long history, Austin Airways operated the following aircraft: Beech 99 (turboprop); Cessna Citation (business jet); Cessna 402; Consolidated PBY Canso (amphibian aircraft); de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver; de Havilland Canada DHC-3 Otter; de Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter (STOL capable turboprop); Douglas DC-3 (includes C-47 model); and Hawker Siddeley HS 748 (turboprop). This history of Austin Airways includes anecdotes of bush and arctic flying, over 250 photographs, and illustrations.
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Billy Bishop, VC
A brief account of the life and career of the First World War, Canadian fighter pilot, Billy Bishop.
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Billy Bishop: Canadian Hero
Billy Bishop was fiercely ambitious, driven by an undisguised hatred of his enemies. He played hard and fought even harder. A highly skilled pilot and a crack shot, "top gun" of the Allied air forces, by 1918 Bishop was the most highly decorated war hero in Canadian history. He remains the most controversial. Some of Bishop's fellow pilots were repelled by his grandstanding and suspected he was deliberately inflating his number of "kills." Since then, the claim has been repeated by many others. This issue is at the heart of Billy Bishop: Canadian Hero. In this updated second edition, author Dan McCaffery reviews the evidence in support his account of what Bishop really did in the skies over France, setting the record straight about one of this country's most famous and controversial figures.
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Bush Pilot’s Mayday: Bush Pilot’s Journal Book One
Bush Pilot’s Mayday is true life adventure based on logbook entries and recollections of the author’s fellow pilots and companions. Ken Forscutt flew a Cessna floatplane for 17 years into various places in Northwestern Canada, the Yukon and the Northwest Territories. His aircraft was equipped with a minimum of radio gear and all navigation was done the “old way” - with maps and a simple compass.Here, Forscutt relates the many adventures and misadventures that befell him as a private pilot. After learning to fly in Manitoba, Ken made numerous trips to remote northern Manitoba lakes for hunting and ice fishing expeditions. In one hair raising adventure, Ken finds himself clinging to a pontoon and locked out of the plane’s cabin as it propels itself across a lake and up into the air. In another, he mistakes the sound of a seat belt banging against the outside of the plane, for a missing strut and causes himself unnecessary grief in landing the plane. Ken often flew parties and individuals to remote fishing lakes in Alberta where fish and adventures abound. He flew in the Northwest Territories where he had several close calls - while landed on an ice field en route to Tuktoyaktuk, Ken is forced to make an impromptu take off when the plane and its occupants are chased by an angry Polar Bear sow and cub. He mistakenly flies into restricted air space when he runs into the Mid Canada Early Warning System. This is a well written book that will appeal to aviators, armchair pilots and anyone who like a good story told well.
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Canada’s Air Force: At War and Peace: Volume 2
No-one interested in the history of Canadian military aviation will want to miss this 3-volume series from Larry Milberry! Volume 2 completes 1939-45. Ch.1 & 2 cover night fighters, intruders & medium bombers. Much on Canadians on Defiants, Beaufighters & Mosquitos, the former a period of frustration, the latter of success. Many personal stories end happily, but sad times also fill the pages. Ch.3 deals with Bomber Command, beginning with Canadians on RAF squadrons, then moves to the first RCAF squadrons on Hampdens & Wellingtons. With some 70,000 words, Ch.3 says much of the bombing campaign. If CAFWP has a brutal chapter, this is it -- some 10,000 young Canadians die on bombers. Chief data sources are the official 6 Group records + diaries, logs & albums of the men who were there. Ch.4 studies Coastal Command on Beaufighters, Liberators, Sunderlands, etc. 60,000 words of new coverage and photos. While RCAF at War revealed new material on the Hornell VC, more is added here. Special coverage of 422 & 423 Sqns (Sunderlands) is not to be missed, nor are the excerpts from combat reports. Air transport is the theme of Ch.5, with more of Norseman, Dakota, Fortress, etc.
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Canada’s Air Force: At War and Peace: Volume 3
No-one interested in the history of Canadian military aviation will want to miss this 3-volume series from Larry Milberry! The first title dedicated solely to the postwar RCAF and the largest of all general RCAF histories. Beginning with the post-1945 slowdown, you'll read how Canada disposed of 1000s of surplus aircraft, whether burned, buried, or sold to get-rich-quick entrepreneurs. Next? The panicky built-up to Korea and the Cold War. Here are all the details about Vampires, Mustangs, Sabres & CF-100s; North Stars & C-119s; Lancasters, Neptunes & Argus; Harvards & T-33s. One chapter deals with R&D projects, whether Arctic navigation, flight test, or weapons; one about the CF-105 will be an eye-opener for those taken in by the Arrow myth makers. Vol.3 has hundreds of fresh colour photos from the 1950s-60s. Dozens of reminiscences enliven this era. Vol.3 takes you beyond unification to the 1970s.
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Canada’s Fighting Pilots
First published in the 1960s and long out of print, Edmund Cosgrove recounts the lives of Canada’s outstanding pilots and their exploits in the two world wars. From the brilliant individualists who flew in the First World War to the tough and dedicated bomber crews of the Second, this is the story of Canadian airmen and their remarkable contribution to the war effort. An essential book for any aviation and history enthusiast, the superbly readable original text that made this book a classic in its day is now supplemented with new and unpublished photos. Gathered together here are the stories of some of Canada’s most celebrated pilots; William "Billy" Bishop, whose daring, solo dawn raid on a German airfield won him the Victoria Cross; William Barker, who fought single-handedly an entire squadron of enemy aircraft; George "Buzz" Beurling, the ace of Malta who achieved a remarkable score of victories fighting from an island under siege; and Andrew Mynarski, whose attempts to save the life of a trapped comrade, high over Germany, ultimately cost him his own. This is their unforgettable story.
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Canada’s National Aviation Museum: Its History and Collections
The museum was first formed in 1964 at RCAF Station Rockcliffe as the National Aeronautical Collection from the amalgamation of three separate existing collections. These included the National Aviation Museum at Uplands, which concentrated on early aviation and bush flying; the Canadian War Museum collection, which concentrated on military aircraft, and which included many war trophies, some dating back to World War One, and the RCAF Museum which focused on those aircraft operated by the Royal Canadian Air Force. In 1988 the collection was moved to a new experimental type triangular hangar. This book, published on the occasion of the opening the new hangar, depicts the Museum's beautiful history from its early beginnings in the halls of the National Research Council in the thirties to its present world-class status.
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Canadian Women in the Sky: 100 Years of Flight
How a few women fought to board planes, then fly them, and finally to break through earth’s atmosphere into space. The story of how women in Canada, from Newfoundland to British Columbia, struggled to win a place in the world of air travel, first as passengers, then as flight attendants and pilots, and, finally, as astronauts. Anecdotes, sometimes humourous and always amazing, trace these women’s challenges and successes, their slow march over 100 years from scandal to acceptance, whether in Second World War skies, in hostile northern bush country, and even beyond Earth’s atmosphere. From the time the first woman climbed on board a flying machine as a passenger to the moment a Canadian woman astronaut visited the International Space Station, this is an account of how the sky-blue glass ceiling eventually cracked, allowing passionate and determined “air-crazy” women the opportunity to fly.
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Dancing in the Sky: The Royal Flying Corps in Canada
Dancing in the Sky is the first complete telling of the First World War fighter pilot training initiative established by the British in response to the terrible losses occurring in the skies over Europe in 1916. This program, up and running in under six months despite enormous obstacles, launched Canada into the age of flight ahead of the United States. The results enabled the Allies to regain control of the skies and eventually win the war, but at a terrible price. Flying was in its infancy and pilot training primitive. This is the story of the talented and courageous men and women who made the training program a success, complete with the romance, tragedy, humour, and pathos that accompany an account of such heroic proportions. A valuable addition to Canada’s military history, this book will appeal to all who enjoy an exceptional adventure story embedded in Canada’s past.
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Fall of an Arrow
On February 20, 1959, Prime Minister John Diefenbaker announced to the House of Commons the cancellation of the CF-105 Arrow. Its development costs to that time were $340 million. The Arrow was to be the world's unsurpassed interceptor aircraft. Yet within two months of the Prime Minister's announcement, six completed aircraft were dismantled and all papers and documents associated with the project were destroyed. Here is the history and development of the Arrow - the plane that would make Canada the leader in supersonic flight technology. The Arrow was designed to fly at twice the speed of sound and carry the most advanced missile weapons system. Here are the stories of the men and women who were in the vanguard of the new technology - who had come from England, Poland, and the United States to make aviation history.
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Flying Canucks II: Pioneers of Canadian Aviation
Among the many technological advances of this century that have shrunk our country, few have had as great an impact as aviation. Technologies evolve and national priorities change, but the qualities necessary to design aircraft, fly them in war and peace, and manage airlines remain constant. In this, his second book about pioneers of Canadian aviation, Peter Pigott brings a richness and understanding of the individuals themselves to the reader. Flying Canucks II takes us into Air Canada’s boardroom with Claude I. Taylor, to the Avro Arrow design office with Jim Floyd, inside the incredible career of Aviation Hall of Fame pilot Herb Seagram, on C.D. Howe’s historic dawn-to-dusk flight, and with Len Birchall in a Stranraer seaplane before he became, in Churchill’s phrase, “The Saviour of Ceylon.” It includes the story of how Scottish immigrant J.A. Wilson engineered a chain of airports across the country, how bush pilot Bob Randall explored the polar regions, and the ordeal of Erroll Boyd, the first Canadian to fly the Atlantic. The lives of “Buck” McNair and “Bus” Davey, half a century after the Second World War, are placed in the perspective of the entire national experience in those years. Whenever possible, Mr. Pigott has interviewed the players themselves, and drawing on his experience and contacts within the aviation community, has created a multi-faceted study of the business, politics, and technology that influenced the ten lives explored in depth in this book. C.D. Howe, wartime Canada’s absolute government czar used to say that running the country’s airline was all he really wanted to do. With a rich aviation heritage such as this, Flying Canucks II depicts the elements and the enemy at their worst and the pioneers of Canadian aviation at their best.
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Flying under Fire, Volume Two: More Aviation Tales from the Second World War
Building on the success of the previous volume, Flying Under Fire, Volume Two, features nine more personal accounts from Canadian pilots who flew in the Second World War. From training camps to posting across Canada, Britain, Europe, and North Africa, these stories capture the excitement, fear, hope, and dread of war-time service, and are all told with the vivid detail of first-hand experience. The contributors to this volume are a distinguished group: two are Air Commodores, three are Hall of Fame members, one has an Order of Canada and a McKee Trophy, and five have Distinguished Flying Crosses. Some, including Art Wahlroth and Bob Fowler, flew bombing missions in the war, many were fighters, and others, like Bill Carr and Jack Winship, performed reconnaissance duties, but all brought back tales of incredible resourcefulness and courage in the face of danger. And central to all their stories are the planes - Mosquitoes, Spitfires, Wellingtons, Meteors, Mitchells, and Kittyhawks fill the pages, each exhibiting the special quirks and personalities the pilots came to know and trust. Flying Under Fire, Volume Two, pays tribute to the roughly 35,000 Canadian airmen involved in the Second World War, honouring their contributions and preserving their stories for generations to come.
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Flying Under Fire: Canadian Fliers Recall the Second World War
Thousands of young Canadians volunteered for service in the RCAF, RAF, and other air services during WWII, risking their lives to protect others. The airforce played a critical part in the Allied victory and the stories of those brave men and women are as powerful and gripping as they were sixty years ago. The stories collected in Flying Under Fire were originally published in the Canadian Aviation Historical Society Journal and are the first-hand accounts of pilots, trainees, and ground crew who recall the danger, excitement, tragedy, and victory of serving their country. They bring an immediacy and a special brand of grim humour to their tales, capturing the hopes, fears, and spirit of the times. This book, made possible by the survivors of a long and difficult war, is dedicated to the memory of the 14,541 air personnel who did not return.
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For the Love of Flying
This book tells the story of Laurentian Air Services and its subsidiaries, Air Schefferville, Delay River Outfitters and more. Drawing on interviews with Laurentian's owners, pilots and ground crew, Danielle Metcalfe-Chenail explores this innovative company's colorful 60-year history from its founding in Ottawa in 1936 with Waco biplanes through the 1990s when it operated twin-engine turboprops. This book is filled with lively flying anecdotes from the cockpits of world-famous bushplanes, including the de Havilland Beaver and Otter, the Douglas DC-3 and the Grumman Goose. From daring rescues and close calls, to the filming of Hollywood's "Captains of the Clouds," Laurentian's pilots did it all. Interlaced with these fascinating accounts are stories of back-country air tourism, the mineral and hydro-power boom in Quebec and Newfoundland-Labrador and tales of flying into fishing and hunting camps in remote regions of Ungava. With an exciting collection of photographs - many never before published - this is a long-overdue book that will appeal to all who enjoy the romance of flying on the frontier.
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Hands to Flying Stations: A Recollective History of Canadian Naval Aviation 1945-1954 (Volume 1)
In the first ten years, fifty eight young men of all ranks died, serving in the cause of Canadian Naval Aviation. Volume One of HANDS TO FLYING STATIONS describes for the first time those early days, and is the story as told by those who were there.
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