1968 Shelby Mustang GT350, GT500 and GT500KR: Muscle Cars In Detail No. 3
There were Mustangs, and then there were Mustangs. Ford wanted its new little Pony Car to appeal to the masses, and in executing that plan, the Mustang could be had in anything from a plain-Jane version with an economical 6-cylinder engine (often referred to as a "secretary’s car"), all the way up to the sporty GT models with optional 271-hp V-8s. Unfortunately, although road-going Mustangs were considered sporty, they were not officially sports cars, at least according to the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA). And Lee Iacocca knew that on-track performance led to showroom performance, so he needed to go racing. Enter Carroll Shelby. Shelby worked with the SCCA to modify the Mustang to meet the SCCA's requirements and enter the racing arena. The result was the now-legendary Shelby Mustang. This volume of CarTech's In Detail series covers the 1968 Shelby GT350, GT500, and GT500KR. In 1968, Ford sought to take over much of the process of producing Shelby Mustangs and increased that production dramatically to meet anticipated sales demand, so it was a bit of a transition year. In an effort to appeal to muscle car fans rather than race fans, the cars were losing their edgy race car feel and were becoming more high-end performance road cars with a long list of performance and comfort options including 428 Cobra Jet Engines, automatic transmissions, and air conditioning. They may have no longer been sports cars, but they were now fantastic muscle cars. As in all In Detail Series books, you get an introduction and historical overview, an explanation of the design and concepts involved in creating the car, a look at marketing and promotion, and an in-depth study of all hardware and available options, as well as an examination of where the car is on the market today. Also included is an appendix of paint and option codes, VIN and build tag decoders, as well as production numbers.
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1969 Chevrolet Camaro SS
In 1969, the Camaro with the SS package took Chevy Camaro performance and styling to another level. First, the Camaro carried updated sheet metal for an aggressive and eye-catching appearance, and the ultra-high-performance 427 big-block engines were available for the first time. As history proved, 1969 was the pinnacle of performance and styling for the first-generation Chevy Camaro. Author and muscle car expert Robert Kimbrough provides a comprehensive examination of the all-time classic 1969 Camaro SS in Volume No. 4 of CarTech's In Detail series. He delves into the design, manufacturing, and equipment of Chevrolet's premier pony car. For the first time in its history, the 1969 Camaro SS had a full slate of high-performance small-blocks as well as big-blocks to conquer the competition on the street and track. The engines included the 350, 375-hp 396, and 425-hp COPO 427 Camaros. The Camaro SS made such an impression, that it became the Indy 500 Pace Car once again in 1969. All In Detail Series books include an introduction and historical overview, an explanation of the design and concepts involved in creating the car, a look at marketing and promotion, and an in-depth study of all hardware and available options, as well as an examination of where the car is on the market today. Also included is an appendix of paint and option codes, VIN and build-tag decoders, as well as production numbers.
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1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS: Muscle Cars In Detail No. 1
The Chevrolet Chevelle undoubtedly has one of the largest followings of any of Detroit's muscle cars. It was a chassis for Everyman, offered in Malibu and Chevelle form, with four-door sedans, station wagons, two-door SS performance models, and even truck-style beds available. It was the mid-size Chevy chassis for all purposes. For many years, until 1970, it existed among mid-size offerings as a fairly capable machine. After the General Motors displacement ban ended for the 1970 model year, Chevrolet put new skin on the Chevelle and a new powerplant under the hood: the vaunted LS6 454 with 450 hp. Today, the 1970 Chevelle SS 454 is viewed as one of the most iconic automobiles ever produced on American soil. SS 396 and 454 Chevelles command a premium at auction and are one of the most coveted muscle cars ever produced. As in all In Detail Series books, you get an introduction and historical overview, an explanation of the design and concepts involved in creating the car, a look at marketing and promotion, and an in-depth study of all hardware and available options, as well as an examination of where the car is on the market today. Also included is an appendix of paint and option codes, VIN and build tag decoders, as well as production numbers.
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American Muscle Cars
Describes the characteristics of a muscle car, looks at specific models produced by Ford, Mercury, Buick, Chevrolet, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, Dodge, Plymouth, and American Motors, and discusses factory race cars, Indy pace cars, and restoration.
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Barracuda Muscle Portfolio 1964-1974
Although the Barracuda was introduced a few weeks before the Mustang in 1964 the earlier models lacked muscle. The 273 helped sales but not for long and in 1967 Plymouth redesigned the car and the engine options included the 383. The 1967 sales figures, however, would never be equaled. For 1969 buyers could have the 440 V8 and body styling was again changed. Despite this and a limited incursion into racing the sales slide could not be halted. As with all other muscle cars the early 1970s emissions and safety regulations killed them off. This is a book of contemporary road and comparison tests, specification and technical data, driver's impressions, new model introductions, history.
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Camaro 5th Gen 2010-2015: How to Build and Modify
The Chevrolet Camaro really needs no introduction to automotive enthusiasts. From its inception (along with the Firebird) in 1967, the Camaro established a reputation that made its name a household word. Insanely popular on the street, successful in all forms of competition, and a perennial best seller, over the past half-century the Camaro has cemented its status as an icon. The Camaro did go on hiatus for an 8-year period, much to the chagrin of Chevrolet, but made a triumphant return in 2010 with the 5th Gen models. Of course the new generation of Camaros is filled with the technology you would expect, including multiple trim versions and a variety of engine packages. And of course, as capable as the new cars are, Camaro enthusiasts always want more. That’s where this book comes in. Filling these pages is great step-by-step information on modifying your 5th Gen, including upgrade instruction on brakes, suspension, rear axles, intake and exhaust, cooling, fuel systems, transmissions, LS engine mods, superchargers, turbochargers, ECM tuning, aftermarket EFIs, and more. There is fierce competition on the street for modern muscle supremacy. With Camaro 5th Gen 2010-2015: How to Build and Modify you can keep your Camaro ahead of the competition.
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Camaro: A Legend Reborn
When Chevrolet entered the pony market in 1967, its Camaro looked like a winner--not just for the muscle car era but for all time. And it was the iconic Camaro, battling Ford's Mustang for dominance, that once again jumpstarted flagging American performance in the 1980s. Now, after another lull and more missed chances, Chevrolet comes roaring back onto the muscle car scene with a Camaro for a new generation--a Camaro destined to be the next classic. Camaro: A Legend Reborn chronicles the rebirth of this legendary car. With drawings and photographs of prototypes and pre-productions vehicles, and in interviews with engineers, designers, and key executives, the book follows each step of the process that led to Camaro's triumphant return. And finally, jaw-dropping photographs of the new car at play on the street and on the track announce the arrival of the ultimate Camaro in no uncertain terms.
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Charger Muscle Portfolio 1966-1974
A little later than the Mustang Dodge announced the Charger in the middle of the 1966 season with the top model having a 425bhp 426 Street Hemi motor. Chargers showed well at the NASCAR superspeedways and had a good performance on the street. The first generation, which featured the 440 Magnum engine, was replaced in 1968. Minor cosmetic changes kept the car fresh until reorganization in 1971 brought in a 115-inch wheelbase to minimize weight gain as emissions controls took their toll on power output. By 1974 the Hemi ceased to be an option when all engines were tuned for low-lead gasoline but the Charger remained until 1974 when the name was transferred to a personal luxury line. This is a book of contemporary road and comparison tests, model introductions, technical and specification data, racing, driver's impressions. Models covered include: 426 Hemi, 440, 500, 440 Six-Pack, 440 R/T, and Charger SE.
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Charger, Road Runner & Super Bee: 50 Years of Chrysler B-Body Muscle
Charger, Road Runner & Super Bee: Fifty Years of Chrysler B-Body Muscle tells the entire B-Body story, from the original Dodge Charger through the popular Charger being sold today.
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Chevelle & SS Gold Portfolio 1964-1972
This upgrade to our popular, now out-of-print Muscle Portfolio title on the Chevelle & SS includes 36 new pages and 43 articles sourced from Car and Driver, Car Life, Cars and many more.
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Chevelle Data & ID Guide: 1964-1972
Few muscle cars have ever enjoyed the long success over time as the Chevrolet Chevelle. From 1964 to 1972, more than 4 million Malibus, Chevelles, El Caminos, and Monte Carlos were produced in dozens of configurations. This creates countless questions when it's time to accurately restore a project car. With the Chevelle Data & ID Guide: 1964-1972, identifying the correct options and codes for your Chevelle becomes much, much easier. This book is a no-nonsense, hard-hitting data book that delivers all of the necessary information to correctly identify the numbers and options associated with your Chevelle. Production Numbers, VIN Decoding, Engine/Transmission/Rear Axle Codes, Interior Codes, Exterior Paint Codes, Color Combination Charts, and Full Options Lists are provided. It delivers a wealth of information in a single publication that will aid you in correctly restoring and authenticating your Chevelle. In addition, each chapter provides the information for you to determine whether or not your Chevelle is a factory SS model. With the Chevelle Data & ID Guide: 1964-1972 you have the missing tool needed to return your Chevelle project to its factory original condition.
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Chevelle Performance Projects, 1964-1972
Many Chevelle owners are not content to keep their cars strictly stock. In the time since these cars were built in the 1960s and 1970s, suspension, steering, brake, and engine technology have taken giant leaps forward. Many Chevelle owners want to enjoy all the benefits of modern technology as well as the pleasure of driving a classic muscle car. But for many owners, completing a coil-over shock install, bolting on aftermarket disc brakes, or installing sub-frame connectors is something they've never done before and seems daunting. In Chevelle Performance Projects, author Cole Quinnell provides comprehensive instruction on upgrades to every component group of the car including chassis, suspension, brakes, transmission, driveline, engine, interior, and electrics. Examples of component installs include HEI ignition, upgrading steering system, tubular A-arms, a 5-speed transmission swap, stiffer coil-over and leaf springs, and much more. Installing a modern GM LS engine is a popular project, and Quinnell covers this complex install from start to finish as well. This book offers a full range of performance projects from mild to wild, so owners can perform minor to extensive modifications. Similar to other titles in the Performance Project Series, it features step-by-step procedures so owners can complete each project with ease. If you are a Chevelle owner and even remotely thinking of upgrades, this first-ever book on the subject will be a mandatory addition to your library.
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Chevy Chevelle Fifty Years
A fifty-year retrospective of Chevy's beloved Chevelle, from family hauler to bad-ass muscle-car bruiser. Chevrolet never intended the Chevelle to be a ground-breaking car. In fact, they intended it to be anything but a ground-breaking car. It may have been conventional, and it may have used old-fashioned technology, but without a doubt the Chevelle was a very, very good car--one of the best of its era. Its body-on-frame design, though nothing radical, made it the perfect platform for harnessing the energy about to be unleashed in the coming horsepower wars. When the dust from the muscle-car era settled, the Chevelle, in LS6 form, reigned supreme as the fastest American car ever built. Its stout full-perimeter frame ensured that the car would handle all that energy and still last for the long haul. The buying public appreciated the Chevelle's simple virtues and responded by making the car an unqualified sales success. In its first year, Chevrolet sold nearly 400,000 Chevelles, outselling the Ford Falcon by nearly 30 percent. When Chevelles disappeared for good after the 1977 model year, Chevrolet had produced over 7.2 million of them. The Chevelle was built to hold up to anything their owners could throw at them, and hold up they did. The Chevelle had such a high survival rate that today it is one of the most common cars seen at car shows across the country--and one of the most beloved. Chevy Chevelle: Fifty Years celebrates America's half-century love affair with this iconic muscle car. Licensed with General Motors, this book showcases never-before-seen archival Chevelle photography to which Motorbooks was given unprecedented access.
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Collecting Muscle Car Model Kits

Tim Boyd Softcover 176 pages

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Corvette Special Editions: Includes Pace Cars, L88s, Callaways, Z06s and More
When the first Corvette was introduced to the public through the traveling caravan known as Motorama, everyone knew there was something special about it. Each subsequent model continued to strengthen that position. But how do you upgrade America's favorite sports car? Make it a special edition! Special edition Corvettes are the tip of the spear when it comes to the American auto manufacturers' special models. Luminous cars such as the 1967 L88 convertible, 1969 aluminum block ZL1, and 2015 Z06 #001 have all commanded a million dollars or more. Modern dealer-tuned cars from Lingenfelter, Callaway, and Hennessey have carried the tradition of making a great Corvette even better. Extremely low mileage on 1978 Pace Cars indicate that people have thought of these cars as investments for nearly 40 years. Keith Cornett of Corvetteblogger.com compiles a murderer's row of special-edition Corvettes in this first-ever compilation on the subject. This book is an encyclopedia of information, as you will learn about some of the rarest Corvettes on the planet. It will serve as a guide if you're looking to add one of these special machines to your collection. Everything you've ever wanted to learn about collectible Corvettes is in Corvette Special Editions.
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Day One: An Automotive Journalist’s Muscle-Car Memoir
Automotive journalist Marty Schorr recalls life on the front line in the classic muscle car era, thrashing brand-new cars that would one day become million-dollar collector vehicles. Most muscle-car books celebrate beautifully-restored vehicles surrounded by hard facts; Day One tells the real story from the point-of-view of one of the period's most respected automotive journalists, Marty Schorr. For the first time, you'll get a unique perspective on what it was like to actually drive, race, and otherwise thrash what are some of today's most valuable collector cars. CARS, the iconic magazine Marty wrote and edited didn't rely on industry advertising for revenue. Instead, the magazine made money the old fashioned way, from newsstand sales, leaving it able to be honest and frank in its coverage of high-performance street cars. CARS magazine reported on both Day stock and modified cars, cars the traditional magazines wouldn't touch, like the ultra-high-performance vehicles from companies like Baldwin-Motion, Yenko Chevrolet, Nickey Chevrolet, Royal Pontiac, and Tasca Ford. Prepare yourself for Day One to cover the most important cars of a given year, such as: Pontiac's 1962-1963 lightweight Super-Duty 421 street and Swiss Cheese models Chevrolet's 1963 big-block 427 Mystery Motor and ZL-1 Impala. Ford 1963 ½ 427/425 Galaxie fastback The 1964 Ramchargers The first 426 Street Hemi Cotton-Owens prepared Hemi Coronet A 1966 Olds Twin-Engined (850 cubic inches) Grant Toronado, currently owned by Jay Leno A prototype 1966 Plymouth 426 Street Hemi Satellite One of two 427 SOHC Galaxies prototypes A '67 Royal Bobcat GTO Plymouth's original '68 Hemi Road Runner Hurst-built Plymouth & Dodge 1968 Hemi-Darts and Hemi-Cudas
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Detroit Muscle: Factory Lightweights and Purpose-Built Muscle Cars
The muscle car era, and the era that immediately preceded it, are a unique window in time; it is one that we will not likely see again. Post-war USA was a place where people wanted to move on from the horrors of conflict, to embrace an era of peace, and to pursue, well, all sorts of things. A whole generation was entering a new prosperity, with home ownership on the rise, gainful employment increasing, the building of suburbs, and a new interstate system connecting everyone. That all helped increase our dependence upon, and in turn, deepen our love affair with the automobile. It started in the 1950s, when automakers realized that if they made their cars more powerful than brand X and won races on the weekends as well, sales would follow those victories into the dealership. Not everybody was enamored with all this new-found performance, however, and throughout the late 1950s and early 1960s, a struggle developed between building faster automobiles and appearing responsible and promoting the cause of safety. This led to racing participation on an all-out corporate level, followed by voluntary self-imposed and publicized bans, back-door cheating on said bans, and then investing in performance again. A byproduct of all this activity was some really fascinating and exciting cars. It began with standard-chassis cars growing bigger and including more powerful engines. Then they graduated to being lighter, putting big engines into mid-size chassis (muscle cars), and building race cars that barely resembled anything on the street. Detroit Muscle: Factory Lightweights and Purpose-Built Muscle Cars follows the evolution of the fastest, most powerful, and exciting vehicles of the era, in both drag racing and NASCAR. From early Hudson Hornets, to the birth of the Hemi, to aluminum and fiberglass panel sedans, to lightweight special-order muscle cars ready to race from the factory.
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